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This Med Student Got Stuck In An Elevator And His Account Is Hilarious

Have you ever wondered what being inside a cell would feel like? Then take it a notch further to imagine being trapped in there for hours? The thought alone can make you cringe! What about being stuck in an elevator for one hour? Do you think it will be better than a cell?

Don’t be too quick to assume. A medical student, Joseph got trapped in an elevator before his first surgery. He simply made a joke out of it. Read on to get the full story.

 

He did not have the luxury of time to cringe for long at the thought as he suddenly found himself plunged into a similar but unpleasant situation. However, he did not find himself inside a cell but inside an elevator. Fortunately, his desperation to get out from there and his mobile phone got him creative.

Without thinking twice, he got on his Snapchat and started uploading his state of quagmire, giving an up-to-date report of how he was faring, live and direct.

In the 60-minute live report, he showed his face in almost all the Snapchats updates. ‘Day 1: Currently trapped in an elevator’, he mused in panic. 10 minutes later, frustration had set in as he asked, ‘Is this what hell feels like?’

At minute 20, his morale was getting on the low side. He wrote ‘Bout to start MacGyvering my way through the ceiling.’

At the 25th minute, he indicated his intention to get violent by showing his interest in using a knife to cut off his arms soon since he was running out of ideas. But he suddenly got humorous at the 28th minute when he brought out his laptop and wrote,  ‘I have named my laptop Wilson.’

The humor stretched into the 33rd minute when he brought out his pen to scratch on the wall, saying he wanted to scratch out solar and lunar cycle to keep track of the date.

 

At minute 37, his beard apparently got tired of waiting to be saved as it grew on his face in protest. Consequently, at minute 41, he turned his laptop into his humor chat mate when he threw a jab at it.

Minute 43, he did not allow his laptop to rest as he intended to eat it up. But at the 50th minute, he wrapped his scrubs around his head to ‘battle the sweltering burns from fluorescent lights.’

Luckily, the heavens got sympathy on him by bringing help along the way at the 60th minute. Two security officers showed up to rescue him. He couldn’t hide his joy as he wrote’ I’M SAVED! I must now reintegrate into society. But I’ve been so long without human contact. Will I even remember how to speak? How to love?”

Like Joseph, many people had at one time, or another found themselves trapped inside an elevator and rather than being relaxed to think, they panic. These tips will help you to survive a lift (elevator) predicament in case you found yourself in one.

Be unruffled.

You can’t afford to panic. This is because panic leads to fear which will not improve your situation. The lift will not crash down on you.

Look for a source of light if the surrounding is dark

Your mobile phone can serve this purpose.

Never think of an attempt to escape through the hatches in the ceiling because it is very dangerous.

Although modern lifts don’t have hatches in the ceiling, yet it will be better not to take chances.

Eliminate negative thoughts and accommodate positive ones.

As long as you are still breathing in the breath of life, then no need to fear. The walls are not closing in on you, and they will not close in. Remember that elevators usually have cameras, so avoid being unreasonable due to fright because the scene will be captured on the cameras.

Press each of the floor buttons one after the other, then try to also press the “doors open” button.

If none of the buttons work, it means that the lift is broken. Inform someone as soon as possible.

Call for help

Call for help using either an emergency or alarm button located on the elevator’s button panel or an emergency phone which should be built into the elevator, most times hidden behind a door under the button panel.

Ensure to check if your phone has any reception or internet connection before the doors shut down.

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